News

May 2009

  • A study conducted by researchers from The University of Arizona and reported in the May 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine shows that youngsters suffering severe nerve poisoning following a scorpion sting recover completely and quickly if a scorpion-specific antivenom is administered.

  • Scorpion stings rarely leave a trace, so when 10-year-old Michael Moerdler-Green woke up at 3 a.m. during a recent family trip to Phoenix, all he knew was that his leg hurt. But as the scorpion’s poison began to spread, his body started to tingle, his eyes rolled around in his head and his legs and arms began to flail.

     

  • TUCSON, Ariz. --Youngsters suffering severe nerve poisoning following a scorpion sting recover completely and quickly if a scorpion-specific antivenom is administered, according to a study conducted by researchers from The University of Arizona and reported in the May 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

  • A Mexican antidote for the sting of the bark scorpion can stop the potentially deadly venom in its tracks within four hours, researchers reported on Wednesday. 

  • A drug used in Mexico proves effective in Arizona test. The Arizona bark scorpion may be small, but its sting delivers a neurotoxin that can kill or render critically ill a young child. A study in the May 14 New England Journal of Medicine finds that an antivenom drug commonly used in Mexico for such stings neutralizes the toxin, eliminates symptoms and reduces the need for sedation in children who have been stung.

     
  • An anti-venom medication used in Mexico but not approved for use in the United States appears able to quickly and completely help children recover from the nerve poisoning caused by the bark scorpion's sting, a new study finds.

     

  • TUCSON, Ariz. --Youngsters suffering severe nerve poisoning following a scorpion sting recover completely and quickly if a scorpion-specific antivenom is administered, according to a study conducted by researchers from The University of Arizona and reported in the May 14 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

  • International forum bolsters UA's poison center research:  Male? Been drinking? Watch out for critters!

     

  • Leslie Boyer, M.D., Director of the VIPER Institute (VIPER stands for: Venom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response) and Jude McNally, RPh, DABAT, Managing Director of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information center Leslie and Jude discussed venomous creatures of the desert, what their venoms do and what happens when the venom gets into humans. We had a full house! Thanks to everyone who came!

  • A multi-disciplinary group of UA scientists and clinicians led by Leslie Boyer, MD, of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center have a new affiliation to add to their CVs: the VIPER Institute. The VIPER Institute became an official academic organizational unit within the College of Medicine following approval by the Arizona Board of Regents last month. VIPER stands for Venom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response.

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